Portuguese and Brazilian immigration patterns and their socio-linguistic implications [Conference by Marian Schoenmakers]

On the 8 June, at 15:00, at the Portuguese Language Center at TSU (Biuilding II, room 203), Marian Schoenmakers will present a conference on Portuguese and Brazilian immigration patterns and their socio-linguistic implications:

Portugal has a long history of emigration, whereas immigration to Portugal, particularly of non-Portuguese speaking people, is fairly recent. Brazil, on the other hand, has a centuries-long history of colonization and massive immigration from all over the world, i.e. Europeans, Africans and Azians. Emigration from Brazil to other countries is, in fact, a new phenomenon.
Emigration and immigration in another country generally has a lot of consequences, including socio-linguistic ones. Among them are language contact and second language acquisition, which could lead to bilingualism. However, they can also initiate processes of language change and first language attrition.
After a brief overview of the migration histories in Portugal and in Brazil, some of the socio-linguistic implications will be discussed more in depth. (M. Schoenmakers)

MARIAN SCHOENMAKERS KLEIN GUNNEWIEK was born in Brazil, but is of Dutch descent and went to the Netherlands with her parents when she was 14 years old. She was in elementary school in Brazil and attended secondary school in the Netherlands, after which she studied Portugese Literature and Culture plus General Linguistics at Radboud University in Nijmegen/the Netherlands. Her PhD at Tilburg University in the Netherlands was in Linguistics, based on research into language contact and first language attrition among Portuguese migrants in The Netherlands and France. She was assistant professor for many years at the Department of Portuguese at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. Currently she is setting up a private agency for research, language training, translation and interpretation, and for consultancy relating to Portuguese-speaking countries and cultures.

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This event is part of a second edition of the series of Conferences/Workshops in English titled “Portuguese and Brazilian Culture for Beginners”, taking place throughout the present academic year at the Portuguese Language Center at TSU and is open to anyone who wishes to know a bit more about Portugal and Brazil’s traditions, music, literature, society, cultural heritage, etc..

To keep updated on the various conferences/workshops to come, check the Portuguese at TSU facebook page regularly (facebook.com/portugueseattsu)

If you wish to secure your place or want to learn more, send an e-mail to vera.peixoto@tsu.ge

 

UPDATE: photos of the conference

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Portuguese Contemporary Painting: Graça Morais [conference]

On Friday, November 20, at 15:00, at the Portuguese Language Center at TSU (Building II, room 203), Diana Cunha presented a conference on Graça Morais’ work, a Portuguese contemporary painter from Trás-os-Montes, in the deep heart of Portugal Northeast, who offers a very interesting and rich path in what concerns biographic and artistic details. Regarding her vast work, Diana chose to focus the presentation on a selection of paintings representing daily scenes, exploring some Portuguese cultural and traditional habits, while analyzing aesthetic and technical features of the artist’s work.

Screen Shot 2015-11-05 at 15.17.28

[Graça Morais | Self portrait]


Diana Cunha was born in Porto in 1989. She studied History of Art at Faculdade de Letras da Universidade do Porto and she holds an MA in Portuguese History of Art.

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This event is part of a second edition of the series of Conferences/Workshops in English titled “Portuguese and Brazilian Culture for Beginners”, taking place throughout the present academic year at the Portuguese Language Center at TSU and is open to anyone who wishes to know a bit more about Portugal and Brazil’s traditions, music, literature, society, cultural heritage, etc..

To keep updated on the various conferences/workshops to come, check the Portuguese at TSU facebook page regularly (facebook.com/portugueseattsu)

If you wish to secure your place or want to learn more, send an e-mail to vera.peixoto@tsu.ge

“The past: a fictional construction?” Conference by Professor Maria de Fátima Marinho (University of Porto)

On the 25th September 2015, at 15:00, the TSU Camões – Portuguese Language Center received Professor Marinho for a very interesting conference titled “The past: a fictional construction?”:

An analysis of the past three decades of fiction has identified recurrent obsessive themes, both varied and unique, which are difficult to ignore. The search for a sense of identity has been frequently put at risk by socio-political factors, such as the loss of African colonies or Portugal’s entry into the European community. Against this backdrop, novelists have created a universe which not only returns continually to the past, as Emmanuel Bouju argues, but also regularly questions the modern day identity crisis.

MARIA DE FÁTIMA MARINHO was born in Porto on 5th February, 1954. She graduated in Romance languages from The Arts and Humanities Faculty of Porto University, where she has taught 19th and 20th century Portuguese literature since 1976. In 1987, she obtained her PhD with a thesis on Surrealism in Portugal. She is Full Professor and has been the dean of the Faculty of Arts (2010-2014). Now she is Vice-President of the University of Porto since June 2014. Her field of studies is Portuguese poetry and the historical novel of 19th and 20th centuries.
The following are some of her research works: Herberto Helder, a Obra e o Homem (1982); O Surrealismo em Portugal (1987); A Poesia Portuguesa nos meados do Século XX – Rupturas e Continuidade (1989); O Romance Histórico em Portugal (1999); Um Poço sem Fundo – Novas Reflexões sobre Literatura e História (2005); O Sonho de Aljubarrota (2007) History and Myth – The Presence of National Myths in Portuguese Literature (2008); A Lição de Blimunda – A propósito de Memorial do Convento (2009).

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